Lawdocs

Sale of Goods

Sale the Goods. Receive the dues.

Create, sign and Sale the Goods. Receive payment. It’s so simple. Experience good. Legally enforceable before the Courts. Optional automated execution through SmartContracts. Various templates to sell anything, everything.

Get The Free Resources​

Search, find, download and edit the draft, free. Or call us for expert service. Choose to get it delivered at your location with or without stamp papers.

Document
  • All

  • Category1

  • Category2

  • Category3

Category1

Agreement for sale of goods

Sale of goods agreement 2

Video

List Of Documents Required

property2, Agreement with Advertisement Agent, Advertisement & Media, Partnership and Founders, Trusts and Wakfs, Hire-Purchase, Sale of Goods, Receipts, Hypothecation and Pledge, Cancellation of Instrument,Will, Family Agreement And Settlement, Exchange of Property​, Indemnity Bond, Bonds, Indemnity and Guarantee

Conveyance

  • Completely filled Form A with signature
  • Original Documents with one set of Xerox copies
  • Two Passport Size Photographs on both copies of documents (Purchaser)
  • Original ID Proof of the concerned Parties (Purchase er and two Witness) like Voter card, PAN card, Passport, Driving License, Adhar Card and in case of companies, power of attorney/board resolution
  • e-Stamp paper with correct value of Stamp duty
  • e-Registration fee Receipt of Registration fee with undertaking / Affidavit
  • If transaction is for more than Rs. 500000/- self at attested copy of PAN Card or Form 60
  • AADHAAR No. If Available
relinquishment, Trusts and Wakfs , Partnership and Founders, Sale of Goods, Will, Receipts, Family Agreement And Settlement, Release / Relinquishment with consideration

Sales Agreement

  • Completely filled Form A with signature [Form A of the Delhi Stamp (Prevention of Under-valuation of Instruments) Rules, 2007]
  • Original Documents with one set of Xerox copies
  • Two Passport Size Photographs on both copies of documents (Seller & Purchaser)
  • e-Stamp paper with correct value of Stamp duty
  • e-Registration fee Receipt of Registration fee with undertaking / Affidavit
  • Original ID Proof of the concerned Parties (Seller, Purchaser & two Witness) like Voter card, PAN card, Passport, Driving License, Adhar Card and in case of companies, power of attorney/board resolution
  • Title document
  • If transaction is for more than Rs. 500000/- self at attested copy of PAN Card or Form 60
  • In case of agriculture Land, NOC
  • AADHAAR No. If Available

Recent Updates

Frequent questions, quickly answered.

Contacts for sale of goods

The contacts for sale of goods are subject to the general principles of the law relating to contracts i.e. the Indian Contact Act. A contract for sale of goods has, however, certain peculiar features such as, transfer of ownership of the goods, delivery of goods rights and duties of the buyer and seller, remedies for breach of contract, conditions and warranties implied under a contract for sale of goods, etc. These peculiarities are the subject matter of the provisions of the Sale of Goods Act, 1930.

A contract of sale of goods is a contract whereby the seller transfers or agrees to transfer the property in goods to the buyer for a price. It thus includes both an actual ‘sale’ and an ‘agreement to sell’, which has been distinguished later.

Goods

‘Goods’ means every kind of movable property other than actionable claims and money; and includes stocks and shares, growing crops, grass and things attached to or forming part of the land, which are agreed to be served from land before sale, or under for contract of sale.

Sale

A ‘sale’ must be distinguished from an ‘agreement to sell’ since the legal implications of the two terms are vastly different. A contract wherein, the property in the goods is transferred from the seller to the buyer, the contract is called a sale, but where the transfer of property in the goods is to take place at a future time, or subject to some conditions, thereafter to be fulfilled, it is called an agreement to sell. An agreement to sell becomes a sale when the time elapses or the conditions are fulfilled subject to which the property in the goods is to be transferred.

There are various kinds of goods and the parties have various options to agree about the delivery of the goods. What shall be the fate of a contract if the goods are perished or destroyed?

Destruction before making of contract:
  • Destruction before making of contract — Where in a contract for sale of specific goods, at the time of making the contract, the goods, without knowledge of the seller, have perished or become so damaged as no longer to answer to their description in the contract, the contract shall become null and void. This is based on the rule of impossibility of performance. Since the subject matter of the contract, which is one of its essential ingredients, itself is destroyed, the contract cannot be carried out.

‘Perishing of goods’ includes not only complete destruction of the goods when the seller has been irretrievably deprived by the goods or when the goods have been stolen or have in some other way been lost and are untraceable, but also when the goods become un merchantable i.e. when the goods has lost their commercial value.

Destruction After the Agreement to Sell but before Sale:
  • Destruction After the Agreement to Sell but before Sale — Where in an agreement to sell specific goods, if subsequently the goods, without any fault on the part of the seller of buyer, perish or become so damaged as no longer answer to their description in the agreement, the agreement shall become void, provided the goods are perished before the ownership and risk passes to the buyer. This rule is based on the ground of impossibility of performance.

If the title to be goods has already passed to the buyer, he must pay for the goods though the same cannot be delivered.

Document of title to goods:
  • A document of title to goods is one, which entitles and enables its rightful holder to deal with the goods represented by it, as if he were the owner. It is used in the ordinary course of business as proof of the ownership, possession or control of goods. It authorizes the possessor to receive the goods. It also confers a right on the possessor to transfer the goods to another person, by mere delivery or by proper endorsement the delivery.

    Cash memo, bill of lading, dock warrant, warehouse keeper’s or wharfinger’s certificate, lorry receipt (L/R), railway receipt (R/R) and delivery order are some of the instances of document of title to goods.

Transfer of property

The property in the goods is said, to be transferred from the seller to the buyer when the latter acquires the proprietary rights over the goods and the obligations linked thereto. ‘Property in Goods’ which means the ownership of goods, is different from ‘ possession of goods’ which means the physical custody or control of the goods.

The transfer of property in the goods from the seller to the buyer is the essence of a contract of sale. Therefore the moment when the property in goods passes from the seller to the buyer is significant for following reasons:

Ownership
  • Ownership — The moment the property in goods passes, the seller ceases to be their owner and the buyer acquires the ownership. The buyer can exercise the proprietary rights over the goods. For example, the buyer may sue the seller for non-delivery of the goods or when the seller has resold the goods, etc.
Risk follows ownership
  • Risk follows ownership — The general rule is that the risk follows the ownership, irrespective of whether the delivery has been made or not. If the goods are damaged or destroyed, the loss shall be borne by the person who was the owner of the goods at the time of damage or destruction. Thus the risk of loss prima facie is in the person in whom the property is.
Action Against Third parties
  • Action Against Third parties — When the goods are in any way damaged or destroyed by the action of third parties, it is only the owner of the goods who can take action against them.
Suit for Price
  • Suit for Price – The seller can sue the buyer for the price, unless otherwise agreed, only after the gods have become the property of the buyer.
Insolvency
  • Insolvency – In the event of insolvency of either the seller or the buyer, the question whether the goods can be taken over by the Official Receiver or Assignee, will depend on whether the property in goods is with the party who has become insolvent.
The two essentials requirements for transfer of property in the goods are:
  • Goods must be ascertained: Unless the goods are ascertained, they (or the property therein) cannot pass from the seller to the buyer. Thus, where there is a contract for the sale of unascertained goods, no property in the goods is transferred to the buyer unless and until the goods are ascertained
  • Intention to PASS Property in Goods must be there: In a sale of specific or ascertained goods the property in them is transferred to the buyer at such time as the parties to the contract intend it to be regard shall be had to the terms of the contract, the conduct of the parties and the circumstances of the case.
Conveyance

“Conveyance” includes a conveyance on sale and every instrument by which property, whether movable or immovable, is transferred inter vivos and which is not otherwise specifically provided for by Schedule I.

“Every kind of movable property other than actionable claims and money; and includes stock and shares, growing crops, grass, and things attached to or forming part of the land which are agreed to be severed before sale or under the contract of sale will be considered goods”

It is a contract, whereby the seller transfers or agrees to transfer the property in goods to the buyer for a price. There can be contract of sale between one part owner and another.

As per section 61 of the sale of goods act the term goods includes all personal property but does not include any services money or intangible property right such as the right to sue. Products of the soil are usually considered goods because they are sold with a view to severance.

A contract of sale is an example of executed contract. Where the agreement to sale is an example of executoree contract. In case of the sale, the right to sale the goods is in the hands of buyer conversely in agreement to sale the seller has the right to sale the goods.

The consumer right Act, 2015 sets out rules relating to the supply of goods to consumers. A single set of rules applies to all contracts, where goods are supplied whether by way of sale, higher, higher purchase of work or material contract. The act also govern the supply of services and digital content.

Open chat