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Adoption

Adopt the legal procedure.

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Deed of Adoption following divorce

Simple Deed of Adoption

Video

List Of Documents Required

Adoption Deed

  • Original Documents with one set of Xerox copies
  • Passport Size Photograph concerned parties on both copies of documents with photograph of baby
  • Original ID Proof of the concerned Parties (Both parents and two Witness) like Voter card, PAN card, Passport, Driving License, Adhar Card and in case of companies, power of attorney/board resolution
  • Court order or letter of providing agencies
  • Birth Certificate of child
  • Stamp duty Rs. 50/
  • Registration fee with undertaking
  • AADHAAR No. If Available

Recent Updates

Frequent questions, quickly answered.

The requirements are as under:-

  1. The person adopting must have the capacity and rite to take in adoption.
  2. Person giving in adoption must have the capacity to do so.
  3. Adopted must be lawfully capable of being take in adoption.
  4. Conditions relating to adoption shall be fulfilled.
  1. Capacity of male

Any male Hindu, who is of sound mind and is not a minor, has the capacity to take a son or daughter in adoption. Provided that if he has a wife living, he shall not adopt except with the consent of his wife. Unless his wife has completely and finally renounced the world. Or has ceased to be a Hindu. Or has been declared by a court of competent jurisdiction to be of unsound mind. If a person has more than one wife living at the time of adoption the consent of all the wives is necessary unless the consent of one of them is unnecessary for any of the reasons specified in the preceding provision.

  1. Capacity of female
  2. Any female Hindu
  3. who is of sound mind
  4. who is not a minor, and who is not married, or if married, whose marriage has been dissolved or whose husband is dead or has completely and finally renounced the world or has ceased to be a Hindu, or has been declared by a court of competent jurisdiction to be of unsound mind,
                  Has the capacity to take a son or daughter in adoption.

Where the woman is married it is the husband who has the right to take in adoption with the consent of the wife.

The person giving a child in adoption has the capacity/right to do so:
  • No person except the father or mother or guardian of the child shall have the capacity to give the child in adoption.
  • The father alone if he is alive shall have the right to give in adoption, but such right shall not be exercised except with the consent of the mother unless the mother has completely and finally renounced the world or has ceased to be a Hindu, or has been declared by a court of competent jurisdiction to be of unsound mind.
  • The mother may give the child in adoption if the father is dead or has completely and finally renounced the world or has ceased to be a Hindu, or has been declared by a court of competent jurisdiction to be of unsound mind.
  • Where both the father and mother are dead or have completely and finally renounced the world or have abandoned the child or have been declared by a court of competent jurisdiction to be of unsound mind or where the parentage of the child is unknown – the guardian of the child may give the child in adoption with the previous permission of the court. The court while granting permission shall be satisfied that the adoption is for the welfare of the child and due consideration will be given to the wishes of the child having regard for the age and understanding of the child.
The court shall be satisfied that no payment or reward in consideration of the adoption except as the court may sanction has been given or taken.

No person can be adopted unless

  • he or she is a Hindu;
  • she or he has not already been she or he has not been married, unless there is a custom or usage applicable to the parties which permits persons who are married being taken in adoption;
  • He or she has not completed the age of fifteen years unless there is a custom or usage applicable to the parties which permits persons who have completed the age of fifteen years being taken in adoption.

Other conditions for a valid adoption are fulfilled.

  • if the adoption is of a son, the adoptive father or mother by whom the adoption is made must not have a Hindu son, son’s son or son’s son’s son living at the time of adoption
  • if the adoption is of a daughter, the adoptive father or mother by whom the adoption is made must not have a Hindu daughter or son’s daughter living at the time of adoption;
  • the adoption is by a male and the person to be adopted is a male, the adoptive father is at least twenty one years older than the person to be adopted;
  • adoption is by a female and the person to be adopted is a male, the adoptive mother s at least twenty one years older than the person to be adopted;
  • same child may not be adopted simultaneously by two or more parents;
  • The child to be adopted must be actually given and taken in adoption with an intent to transfer the child from the family of birth.
Adoption

is the transplantation of a son from the family in which he is born, into another family by gift made by his natural parents to his adopting parents.

Islam does not recognize adoption. In Mohammed Allahdad Khan v. Mohammad Ismail it was held that there is nothing in the Mohammedan Law. Similar to adoption as recognized in the Hindu System.

Acknowledgement

Acknowledgement of paternity under Muslim Law is the nearest approach to adoption. The material difference between the two can be stated that in adoption, the adoptee is the known son of another person, while one of the essentials of acknowledgement is that the acknowledger must not be known son of another.

However an adoption can take place from an orphanage by obtaining permission from the court under Guardians and wards act.

The personal laws of these communities also do not recognise adoption. Here too an adoption can take place from an orphanage by obtaining permission from the court under Guardians and wards act.

As per Indian law, a Hindu may take a child from another family and adopt the child as his own. The objective is to secure the performance of funeral rites and to preserve the continuity of lineage. The adopting person may be a bachelor or a spinster or a widower or a widow or a divorcee. Whereas, the adopted person may be a male of female.

The Hindu adoptions law and maintenance Act, 1956 applies to all Hindus, Buddhist, Jaina and Sikh by religion.